For all of the musicians on the board

techy question

Sun Aug 17, 2008 1:48 pm

tosh wrote:
Doc Bob wrote:Strictly speaking, A Capella , means "in the style of a chapel".

Well, not quite but I can't be arsed with the pedantry.(apart from pointing out the missing letter because it means I can say - Can I have a P please Bob?)
I'm sure you and everyone else knew exactly what I meant.


you're both right - capella is the latin, cappella is italian. but...because the italian language spawned most musical terminology and the latin translation is "in the style of a chapel", the italian spelling would be considered the most accurate for relevancy. ;)

techy question

Sun Aug 17, 2008 2:00 pm

SheChameleon wrote:
tosh wrote: Well, not quite but I can't be arsed with the pedantry.(apart from pointing out the missing letter because it means I can say - Can I have a P please Bob?)
I'm sure you and everyone else knew exactly what I meant.


you're both right - capella is the latin, cappella is italian. but...because the italian language spawned most musical terminology and the latin translation is "in the style of a chapel", the italian spelling would be considered the most accurate for relevancy. ;)


Wouldn't Alla Capella be 'in the style of' ? my Latin is a bit rough around the edges ;-)

techy question

Sun Aug 17, 2008 2:11 pm

tosh wrote:
SheChameleon wrote:
you're both right - capella is the latin, cappella is italian. but...because the italian language spawned most musical terminology and the latin translation is "in the style of a chapel", the italian spelling would be considered the most accurate for relevancy. ;)


Wouldn't Alla Capella be 'in the style of' ? my Latin is a bit rough around the edges ;-)


nope... latinum est a capella.. (with one "p" )


Alla Capella is a turkish folk singer currently on his world tour of Bodrum. ;D

techy question

Sun Aug 17, 2008 2:11 pm

tosh wrote:
Doc Bob wrote:

Strictly speaking, A Capella , means "in the style of a chapel".

Well, not quite but I can't be arsed with the pedantry.(apart from pointing out the missing letter because it means I can say - Can I have a P please Bob?)
I'm sure you and everyone else knew exactly what I meant.


a Latin "p" or an Italian "p" Tosh???

techy question

Sun Aug 17, 2008 2:41 pm

tosh wrote:
SheChameleon wrote:
you're both right - capella is the latin, cappella is italian. but...because the italian language spawned most musical terminology and the latin translation is "in the style of a chapel", the italian spelling would be considered the most accurate for relevancy. ;)


Wouldn't Alla Capella be 'in the style of' ? my Latin is a bit rough around the edges ;-)


you're nearly 100% - it's not latin, but italian. you are right "in the style of", but the spelling becomes crucial (give that man a "P" ;)). alla cappella is closer to what you're getting at here meaning the syle of the church, but leave it alla capella and you're talking about goats!

techy question

Tue Aug 19, 2008 7:31 am

SheChameleon wrote:
tosh wrote:
Wouldn't Alla Capella be 'in the style of' ? my Latin is a bit rough around the edges ;-)


you're nearly 100% - it's not latin, but italian. you are right "in the style of", but the spelling becomes crucial (give that man a "P" ;)). alla cappella is closer to what you're getting at here meaning the syle of the church, but leave it alla capella and you're talking about goats!


Nice to see that DocBob and I aren't the only pedants posting on the Forum!

techy question

Tue Aug 19, 2008 11:10 am

Beowulf wrote:
SheChameleon wrote:you're nearly 100% - it's not latin, but italian. you are right "in the style of", but the spelling becomes crucial (give that man a "P" ;)). alla cappella is closer to what you're getting at here meaning the syle of the church, but leave it alla capella and you're talking about goats!

Nice to see that DocBob and I aren't the only pedants posting on the Forum!


hey now! just an affinity for language etymology, nothing more. i'm a wealth of useless knowledge so i'll be the first to spew it when given the opportunity! ;D

btw - it's pedantress ;)

techy question

Mon Sep 08, 2008 9:12 am

SheChameleon wrote:
Beowulf wrote:Nice to see that DocBob and I aren't the only pedants posting on the Forum!


hey now! just an affinity for language etymology, nothing more. i'm a wealth of useless knowledge so i'll be the first to spew it when given the opportunity! ;D

btw - it's pedantress ;)


It is? I really hadn't noticed at all! ;)

techy question

Thu Sep 18, 2008 6:05 pm

back on topic, the special edition dvd shows them recording without reverb, might have more to do with the final performance than the mic.

techy question

Fri Sep 19, 2008 8:35 pm

tezmond wrote:back on topic, the special edition dvd shows them recording without reverb, might have more to do with the final performance than the mic.

Yes but reverb is usually applied post recording, and also if you send a reverb to the ears of the singer while recording, he/she will sing flat. Dry is always best and always gets the best performance.
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